Technology / TV / U.S. News

Does response to school cop video show law enforcement rift?

In this image taken from video, Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott speaks during a press conference in Columbia, S.C., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015. Lott suspended Ben Fields, a senior deputy with the Richland County Sheriff’s Department, without pay after a video showed Fields forcibly removing a student who refused to leave her high school math class at Spring Valley High School. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz)

In this image taken from video, Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott speaks during a press conference in Columbia, S.C., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015. Lott suspended Ben Fields, a senior deputy with the Richland County Sheriff’s Department, without pay after a video showed Fields forcibly removing a student who refused to leave her high school math class at Spring Valley High School. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz)

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A video showing a high school resource officer flipping a student out of her chair prompted the officer’s firing and the county sheriff to call for citizens to record more videos to keep police accountable.

Those statements came just days after FBI Director James Comey said fears about being caught on video could be causing police to ease up on the fight against crime. The remarks by Comey and Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott are part of a growing debate about the role of technology in policing.

It also hints at a disconnect on the issue between beat cops and the brass.

Rich Roberts, a spokesman for the International Union of Police Associations, said the climate surrounding police is definitely affecting how officers do their jobs.

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